My initial tagline for Juke was

“Serving Pies Since 1985…”

It makes no sense. But, like most nonsense, it appeals to me.

A better way to describe this place would be as a creative sandbox—an experimental outlet for myself, Tonya Morton (hi!), and for a few friends whose work I’ve always admired and enjoyed. For now, it’s four of us: myself, Damon Falke, Ned Mudd and Paul Vlachos. And I’m hoping to find more contributors over time while we each develop our crazy ideas.

We are, collectively, writers, photographers, artists and musicians. We’re planning to dabble in all those forms, and maybe branch out into videography and podcasting too (because, hey, why not?). In short, we’re going to play around and create things, which is considerably more fun with a community of readers to give us feedback.

Why subscribe?

Subscribe to get full access to the newsletter and website. We’re planning to maintain a bi-weekly posting schedule, so you will have the pleasure of our company often enough to (hopefully) enjoy what you read, but not so often that you’ll get sick of us.

Stay up-to-date

Every new edition of the newsletter goes directly to your inbox. Paid subscribers will get more direct access to our writers, and will see special previews and special member-only posts. Free subscribers will still be able to see most of our work and be a part of the conversation.

Join the Juke

Juke is looking for unpublished…

*Essays

*Fiction

*Poetry

*Photography

*History

*Art

*Music

*Ephemera

Send short pieces/art/music via email to tonyajuke@gmail.com. For longer pieces (over 1500 words) send a one-paragraph description/explanation. We’ll try to respond in a normal human timeframe.

Contributors are paid, albeit poorly, from the pool of subscription funds. You’ll retain all rights to your own work, and we won’t sell your soul to anybody without telling you first.

But before you submit! Make sure your submissions are well-edited and out of the ordinary—ideally without being precious or impenetrable. Write for an adult, non-academic audience.

No bullshit and, please, no advertising—unless it’s ironic advertising.

If you want to lie, do it well. The truth is also acceptable. But we can’t afford any attorneys, so change the names if you’re telling some really juicy truths.

Basically, don’t take stuff too seriously. But don’t NOT take it seriously either. Does that make sense?

Email a Submission